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The latest news on Money Media from Business Insider

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    Bloomberg TV's Trish Regan just tweeted the great news.

    In April, Regan announced that she was with child.

    SEE ALSO: Trish Regan's Biggest Screw Up At Work Was Forgetting A Very Important Article Of Clothing >

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    Every now and then CNBC leaves Englewood, NJ and takes their show on the road. Today, they've taken it to The Pierre Hotel for the CNBC Institutional Investor Delivering Alpha conference.

    That said, you still need the right lighting on Bartiromo and you still need the sound to be just-so for Sorkin, Caruso-Cabrera and the rest of the gang. That means you need to set up a studio.

    And what a studio they set up, ladies and gentlemen. It's right outside the auditorium. Check out the pictures below:

    CNBC set delivering alpha 2012

     

    CNBC set delivering alpha 2012

     

    CNBC set delivering alpha 2012

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    delivering alpha

    It only happens once a year, so pay attention.

    CNBC/Institutional Investor Delivering Alpha conference attracts some of the most brilliant minds in finance to come, listen (or speak), and schmooze at he The Pierre Hotel.

    This year's keynote speakers include KKR's Henry Kravis, former Treasury Secretary Hank Paulson, U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara, and former Treasury Secretary and Co-chair of the Council on Former Relations Robert E. Rubin.

    Guests will also get to hear from hedge fund managers Jim Chanos, Cliff Asness, Leon Cooperman and more.

    Excellent. But what do you expect from an event where Larry Fink, Mohamed El-Erian and Bill Ackman sit on the Advisory Board?



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  • 07/22/12--07:15: The Women Of Bloomberg TV
  • angie lau

    You may remember that we've introduced you to all the women of Bloomberg before.

    But since then, the network has brought in some new faces and said goodbye to some more familiar ones.

    No worries though, it's still a collection of smart, talented journalists committed to giving you hard news on markets, Wall Street, politics and more.

    You'll probably recognize most of these ladies, but some of them will be new to you because they cover markets in Hong Kong or Dubai. To catch them, you'd have to wake up extra early.

    But maybe it's worth it...

    Cristina Alesci

    What she does: Alesci covers private equity and deal making for Bloomberg TV and Bloomberg News. She also writes Bloomberg Businessweek and Bloomberg Markets Magazine.

    Background: Before Bloomberg Alesci worked at law firm Sidley Austin and Pfizer. She has a masters degree in journalism from NYU and completed her undergraduate education at Pace University.



    Haslinda Amin

    What she does: Singapore-based news correspondent and anchor.

    Background: Amin also covers news throughout the day from Southeast Asia and the Indian subcontinent and reports from international events such as the World Economic Forum and Association of Southeast Asian Nations meetings.



    Willow Bay

    What she does: L.A. based correspondent for Bloomberg TV.

    Background: Bay is a seasoned television personality — having worked everywhere from Lifetime to ABC and CNN — as well as a published author. She graduated cum laude from the University of Pennsylvania with a B.A. in literature and received a master's degree from New York University's Stern School of Business.



    See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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    Sanford Weill

    Former Citi CEO and Wall Street legend Sandy Weill is hosting Squawk Box today, and it's unlike anything we've ever seen.

    He's waxing philosophical on everything (Weill even called for the break-up of Wall Street banks) and, even more importantly, almost every guest has some relation to Weill through his many philanthropic causes.

    • JD Hove from the National Academy Foundation was a guest, and Weill is the founder and chairman of that organization.
    • Clive Gillman, the Director of Carnegie Hall, where Weill has a a recital hall named after him and is the Chairman of the Board of Trustees.
    • Jessica Bibliowicz, Weill's daughter and CEO of National Financial Partners corp.
    • Dr. Laurie Glimcher Dean of the Weill Cornell Medical Center, of course, Weill sits on the Board of Trustees.

    That is just totally baller.

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    britney spears toxic

    Everyone needs a quick break during their day, especially when you're working with this market.

    That's obviously why CNBC puts fun music breaks throughout their program (and so does Bloomberg, but that's for another day).

    These hot jams have the ability to get our office singing along, or even in some cases, dancing in our seats (sorry if you're boss frowns on that).

    So we though we'd put together some of the best jams we've heard lately for your review. If you've got some input on something we've missed, put it in the comments section.

    Madness — Our House (our Mamta Badkar's favorite)



    Skrillex — Bangarang (Reader pick)



    TLC — Creep



    See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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    We expect this from Rick Santelli, or maybe Joe Kernan, but we didn't see this epic Sandy Weill rant coming from CNBC's Gary Kaminsky.

    While speaking with Melissa Lee on the topic, he pointed out that from 2000 to 2010 when Weill was selling his 'supermarket' bank concept, Citigroup stock went down 90%. Not only that, but Weill himself cashed out $785 million in stock and options.

    This upset Kaminsky a great deal.

    Here's what he said:

    "What is my point here? I was at those meetings. I know what Sandy Weill told people. I was an institutional investor. So when Weill comes on TV and talks about his charitable endeavors, which we know a very good thing, when he was able to cash out all that type of stock in a time when the supermarket model...the breakdown of Glass-Steagall...something he said at that time was the model of the future... What about all the employees? What do you tell them when they lost 90% of their wealth because they bought into this financial supermarket model that doesn't work.... They still hold a tremendous amount of stock in their retirement plans. You cannot change history...these management teams think they can rewrite history... well let me tell you something... I'm their worst nightmare... I know where all the bodies are buried."

    Here's the video:

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    We're a little obsessed with the music played on financial TV. It provides us with a break from whatever market data or Wall Street scandal we're currently mulling over, and that's just wonderful.

    And every now and then, both CNBC and Bloomberg seriously hit the mark with their jams.

    But we've never been as impressed as we were this afternoon when CNBC played 'We Are The Robots' by the godfathers of electronic music, Krafterwerk. CNBC, we never knew you had such refined taste.

    The notoriously reclusive German band just finished doing an amazing concert series at New York City's Museum of Modern Art, where they played each of their 8 ground-breaking albums over 8 consecutive nights.

    We were there. It was sick.

    Check out 'We Are The Robots' below:

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    We've been looking forward to this all day.

    Congressman Barney Frank (D-MA) was just a guest on CNBC's Closing Bell with Maria Bartiromo, and quite frankly, the interview went from zero to ugly in less than two minutes.

    Maria started off by asking Barney about the topic du jour, Sandy Weill's complete reversal on the concept of a the 'supermarket' mega bank.

    Barney responded saying that it was not a useful time to be talking about this because "you can accomplish much of what he's talking about with the Volcker Rule..."

    To which Maria replied, after much rambling from Barney, that "the problem with the Volcker Rule is that you can't define it."

    Frank denied that notion. "Most of them (the banks) know what they're doing. They're not blindly moving around..."

    Maria cut him off saying, "so you're going to leave it to the banks to tell you this is proprietary trading or this is proprietary trading?"

    After that comment, they were off. Barney got frustrated and said, "Maria, if you want to have a serious conversation without mocking me..."

    You can imagine the tone of the interview from that point.

    Our favorite moment? Maria asked Barney when the fiscal cliff issue would be resolved in Congress saying: "When are the adults going to enter the room?"

    To which Barney replied:

    I don't take kindly to being called a non-adult. You know, you remind me sometimes of what your colleague Joe Kernen said when I tried to get the conversation more thoughtful ... he said, 'Oh this is cable TV, not C-SPAN' ... I want to talk seriously about the issues ... you keep changing the subject."

    And then they exploded. Watch the ful video below:

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    Stephanie Ruhle

    This past weekend, the designated market maker, Knight Capital, secured crucial financing to keep the company afloat via a deal with Jefferies. 

    Stephanie Ruhle of Bloomberg Television's Market Makers, explained the deal and all that happened during the 48 hour window.

    In the clip, Ruhle does a fantastic job describing exactly why Knight CEO Tom Joyce chose the Jefferies deal and not the deal proposed by Ken Griffin of Citadel

    Did you know that in 2011, Citadel hired two of Knight's former executives to run the firms new quantitative trading unit?

    Well, here's the clip from Bloomberg

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    We're not sure why Jim Cramer is dressed as a hipster right now (maybe its New York Fashion Week related) but here it is on his Twitter feed, in all its glory.

    We use the term "glory" loosely.

    jim cramer hipster yellow pants

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    There was definitely an awkward moment on CNBC's "Squawk Box" this morning during a segment with Lululemon's CEO.

    Co-host Joe Kernen told everyone about the time he made a mistake of wearing boxers under his Lululemon pants, which resulted in some "unsightly adjusting."

    Here's Kernen: 

    "I wore my boxers with the pants and oh my god it was like the worst.  I wasn't in a place where I could take them off.  And I mean there was a lot of unsightly adjusting and stuff. So you don't wear anything?  You wear Lululemon or you wear nothing at all? That's what I'm saying. There's no underwear with Lululemon, right?" 

    Now Kernen knows that you're not supposed to wear boxers with running shorts if they have a built-in liner. 

    Check out the video clips below.

    That's not all. Kernen even got a special sign off for his "squawkward moment."

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    Mark Cuban

    Mark Cuban's disdain for high frequency trading (HFT) is no secret, and today, as the SEC discusses ways to ensure that it does not create more volatility in the market, Cuban has a platform to speak out about the issue.

    Actually, "speak" doesn't do Cuban's CNBC spot justice. He comes out swinging against pithy reforms that he believes would do nothing to curb the dangers of HFT (like kill switches) and says stock exchanges are to blame for all of this.

    Check out the quote below:

    It's really just the NYSE protecting their own... they're the root of this problem despite the fact that people don't want to admit it....they're a for-profit entity now as opposed to being a non-profit entity in the past and they're doing what every for-profit entity does — They're trying increase their sales protecting their best customers and to do this they're creating all these different kinds of order types. How many order types do you need? Well in the case of the NYSE and other exchanges they create as many as they can to try to get more algorithmic trading to try to enhance more volume and even to pay for that volume... The root of the problem is what's going on at all the exchanges and all the algorithmicly driven trading is just a symptom of that.

    So what does Cuban think we should do about all of this? 

    • You can pare it at the edges with measures like kill switches which "do nothing."
    • Or you say, "we're done, there's no investor confidence... maybe you go back and change the rules and make these exchanges non-profit again, though I don't know how you're going to do it."

    Bottom line: Cuban says we have to do something or we're going to see something much worse than a Knight Capital or a 2010 Flash Crash. "There's no such thing as bug free software," he said.

    "When you have algorithms trying to out battle other algorithms to  to get a trading edge there's no way to know what the results will be... There are more trades that happen in the blink of an eye...that's just the reality of technology. And they're trying to make it faster."

    Watch the video below:

     

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    We thought it couldn't get any worse than the high pitched squeals of the GEICO pig. But no, we stand corrected.

    About a week ago, a new commercial appeared on financial TV with a jingle that prompts a collective cringe from everyone in our office who, like many of our readers, watches financial TV (Bloomberg/CNBC) all day long.

    The commercial is for HP's Office Jet Printer. At first we heard it and thought — wow, what a fun song — all of that changed when we realized that it was going to be played during every commercial break for what seems like the rest of eternity.

    We have no idea as to the quality of the product advertised, but since this commercial's annoying jingle seems to have the ability to drill holes into our brains, we haven't the patience to look into it.

    If you haven't seen the commercial here it is:

    (And by the way, it's worth noting that the jingle is actually a song by Bananarama. So our sincere thanks goes out to them too.)

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    We're not sure if you noticed, but Business Insider rang the Opening Bell this morning on CNBC (tomorrow is our SAI 100 party on the floor of the NYSE so it's becoming a tradition).

    If you did see it, you may or may not have noticed Clusterstock (Linette Lopez and Julia La Roche) clapping from the floor before the camera panned up to our CEO Henry Blodget and co. ringing the bell.

    Here's the video below:

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    Bloomberg TV's Stephanie Ruhle has been at the University of Virginia since last night, interviewing hedge fund manager Kyle Bass, talking to Darden Business School students, and attending a football game.

    Obviously, we're jealous. Ruhle had a wonderful time, and said as much during a short monologue on Bloomberg.

    Here's a snipit:

    "I cannot believe my loyal team in New York is playing 'Hot For Teacher', they do everything they can to make me feel like a cougar and let me tell you on the field last night with the team I sure felt like one."

    Watch the whole thing below:

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    Jim Edwards

    Back in June, I decided to put my money where my mouth is and buy $1,000 of Facebook stock. I got 30 shares for roughly $31/share and, as history now shows, FB promptly tanked to $17.73 in the following weeks — costing me nearly $400 on paper.

    The stock has since rebounded a bit to ~$24, but I'm still hundreds of dollars in the red.*

    So how do I feel?

    Oddly, I'm still bullish on Facebook for the long term. Here's why:

    Back in June, I argued four things about the future of Facebook:

    1. That Facebook has a long, long way to go and hasn't yet gotten beyond first gear in terms of its revenue generating products.
    2. That Facebook is sitting on an unimaginably large pool of valuable but untapped marketing data.
    3. That advertisers are still figuring out how to use Facebook, meaning that the "real" money has yet to arrive.
    4. And that Facebook is the biggest boat in the social media harbor, and will thus rise highest on the incoming tide.

    Then a bunch of Facebook insiders cashed out, heavily diluting the stock, and driving down its price. (I expected that, although — naively — I didn't expect it to cost me nearly half my stake.)

    Five months on, with the dilution mostly in the rear view mirror, those four fundamental factors about Facebook all still seem to be true — and Facebook's revenue is still growing.

    The company is bolting on numerous ways to advertise. It's also just beginning to exploit its data pool (via your phone number for instance, or through its customer data partnership with Datalogix.)

    When I bought FB, its Q1 2012 revenue was $1.058 billion. In Q2, it booked $1.262 billion — it's adding $100 million in revenue every three months, in other words.

    And that's before it's even filled in some of the most obvious gaps in its business, such as a display ad network.

    Some analysts are coming round to my point of view. Cantor Fitzgerald and Piper Jaffray both just issued positive reports on the company (although both have target prices lower than my ill-timed entry point.)

    I'm not a technical investor, as my brief track record here indicates. I prefer to look at the fundamentals. And right now, I cannot imagine a scenario in which Facebook suddenly starts shrinking or becoming less attractive to the advertisers who generate its revenue.

    A few more months of this and maybe I'll get my money back.

    *If you are one of those people who does not believe $400 is a lot of money, then please send a check made out to me personally for that sum, c/o Business Insider, 257 Park Avenue South, NYC NY 10010.

    SEE ALSO: Remember When Facebook Wanted Your Phone Number? It's Using It To Sell Ads

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    Mitt Romney's chief economic advisor Glenn Hubbard, who is the dean of Columbia Business School, was on CNBC moments ago from the Dealbook conference.

    During his "Squawk on the Street" segment, part of the CNBC set fell on him.

    "Uh, Glenn are you alright?" anchor Melissa Lee asked.

    "I'm fine," he responded with a smile on his face.  "That's what happens when you criticize the welfare state," he added.

    He actually handles the whole thing quite well.  

    We've included screen shots of the incident as well as a video clip below.

    hubbard

    hubbard 2

    hubbard 3

    hubbard 4

    Watch the YouTube video here [via Talking Points Memo].  

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    david tepper

    Legendary hedge fund manager David Tepper is on Squawk Box this morning, and it's a special treat.

    Aside from the fact that his $16 billion fund is up 25% net, the last time Tepper was on in 2010 his words moved markets.

    This morning he's waxing poetic on everything from the American economy to this weekend's Japanese elections, but he also took some time to try to heal an open media hostility in the financial world.

    "Do you guys have Bloomberg machines," Tepper asked the Squawk crew.

    A collective 'no' rose from the group, and Becky Quick admitted that CNBC can't have Bloomberg machines because the competitor will not give them a contract.

    Tepper looked disappointed for the crew.

    "Did you ever seen the Miracle on 24th Street Bloomberg? Give CNBC Bloombergs," he said into the camera.

    Clearly, Tepper is in the holiday spirit.

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    We noticed that Maria Bartiromo and Meredith Whitney were wearing similar outfits today during CNBC's "Closing Bell."

    Check it out:

    maria and meredith

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